About Admin RCI Action Committee Website

Wojtek Gwiazda has been the spokesperson for the RCI Action Committee since 1991. The Committee is supported and funded by the union that represents almost all RCI employees: the Syndicat des travailleuses et travailleurs de Radio-Canada (STTRC formerly SCRC). E-mail: wojtekrciaction@gmail.com
Website: http://rciaction.org/blog
Admin RCI Action Committee Website has written 106 articles so far, you can find them below.


Radio Canada International, thoughts for the future

There’s a remarkable document from 1994 few are aware of, which 27 years later highlights some astute observations and pragmatic possible solutions to the problems facing Radio Canada International in 2021.

Its dry title “Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications on the Mandate and Funding of Radio Canada International” barely hints at the incisive analysis and conclusions in the report’s 29 pages.

The Senate Committee’s decision to examine and report on Radio Canada International came about because of the efforts of a Progressive Conservative Senator, Finlay MacDonald, and a Liberal Senator, Raymond Perrault. It came after the failed attempt by the CBC to shut down RCI in 1990 and the service’s budget cut of 50 percent in 1991, which eliminated half the language services and about half of the staff of 200.

In an overview of the history of the international service, the Senate report very quickly highlighted the Fowler Commission on Broadcasting of 1965, its recommendation that the international service be called Radio Canada International (it was in 1972), and the fact that the Commission saw the need for expanding the services of the international service:

Broadcasting to overseas audiences is still, and will always be, an indirect aid to Canadian foreign policy. But it is also a direct means to other important ends: the projection abroad of a Canadian image that reflects the nature of the country and its people, their policies, beliefs, and tastes

The Senate report did not mince words in describing the situation facing Radio Canada International after the 1991 budget cut:

RCI’s limited funding as set out in its post-1991 budget is hampering its ability to adapt to this changing environment, and no doubt RCI’s market share is eroding on this basis. All told, the Committee finds that stakeholder estimates of 11 million listeners lost due to these funding cutbacks do not seem unreasonable.

While these estimates of lost audiences remain debatable, the loss in Canada’s prestige around the world is not.

It’s strange to see how current some of the observations of witnesses to the inquiry were. From the Business Council on National Issues:

In an era of globalization and international communication, it is essential to maintain a strong Canadian voice abroad and to provide a “window”, if you will, on Canadian issues, perspectives, institutions and initiatives.

When the Senate report deals with the mandate of Radio Canada International it goes straight to the heart of many of the difficulties faced by RCI, particularly in its relationship with the CBC:

Thus the Committee feels that the mandate is too fungible and subject to too much interpretation. For example, the mandate uses terms such as: to provide, to distribute, and to broadcast. The mandate does not use the terms: to produce, to present, or to create. The subtle differences in the meanings of these terms are at the heart of these conflicting and argumentative interpretations.

Furthermore, the mandate uses terms such as: “designed to attract an international audience… “; to “further developing international awareness of Canada… “; and to “reflect the realities and quality of Canadian life and culture.” These terms are very much expressions that are qualitative rather than quantitative. The relevance of this subtle fact becomes apparent with the aid of examples. Non-targeted programs produced by the CBC, such as As It Happens, or by the SRC, such as Le Magazine Economique, are specifically designed to attract a domestic audience, not an international audience. An international audience can only be qualified as “collateral” demand for such broadcasts, and, as such, these programs are certainly not an effective way to attract an international audience.

And then the report highlights the core problem facing RCI’s existence and mandate:

While the Committee recognizes and does not wish to encroach upon the arm’s length relationship of the CBC with the government, particularly relating to its programming functions, it nevertheless concludes that some guidance should be provided to the CBC by the government in terms of its international service as entitled under subsection 46(2) of the Broadcasting Act.

The Committee recommends that the government ask the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to review the mandate of its international broadcasting service in consultation with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada with a view to clarifying and strengthening it. This review would consider the inclusion in the mandate of an obligation on the part of Radio Canada International to produce and create English and French language programs to be broadcast to all mandated geographic regions, prioritizing these regions to include countries such as Japan, Germany, and China.

After outlining some of the issues in the organizational structure of Radio Canada International and its relationship with the CBC and, at the time, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (FAIT), the Senate report concludes “the objectives of RCI are more consistent and compatible with the foreign and trade policy objectives of FAIT than that of the cultural policy objectives of the CBC. “

But it also concludes “something lacking in the present organization of RCI between the CBC and FAIT. The simultaneous withdrawal of service from Japan and Central Europe, in particular Germany, creates a vacuum in broad information dissemination to these geographic areas. The end of RCI transmissions to these key trading markets to Canada is contributing to a growing gap in public awareness of Canada…” And so it recommends the establishment of an Advisory Council to Radio Canada International with members from the Canadian community with specialized knowledge of international affairs, trade or communication which would report to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

When the Senate report addresses the issue of government funding of Radio Canada International it immediately raised the most important issue:

An unfortunate fact of international broadcasting is that the listening audience is not resident of the broadcasting company’s home country and, thus, a political constituency promoting these vital services does not form to make sure that government officials and politicians take notice of their interests. International broadcasting, therefore, is a “pure” public good with no highly visible or vocal political base. This problem appears to be more serious in Canada than elsewhere.

The Committee believes that the previous recommendation to establish an Advisory Council on RCI affairs and to have it report the Minister of FAIT would to some extent address this problem in the future.

While recognizing the funding problems of Radio Canada International, the Senate report praised the way RCI was run:

The Committee concludes that RCI is run effectively within its budgetary constraint and represents money well spent, but is underfunded…

The Committee also feels that the current funding arrangement must be modified to provide for better planning of these services. The Committee concludes that RCI executives and officers require a longer funding time horizon.

The Senate report recommended that funding to RCI be restored at its 1990 level so that the seven languages dropped in 1991 would be restored, and ended with the intention to follow up:

It is the intention of the Committee to follow-up on the implementation of its recommendations to the government. In February 1995, the Committee will invite the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada and his officials to respond to it and to indicate to the Committee the actions taken and planned to be taken (with a time schedule for implementation) by his Department on these matters.

But in 1995, CBC again tried to shut down Radio Canada International, saying it did not have the budget for the international service. The government stepped in with funding. The same scenario was repeated in 1996.

The Senate Committee’s recommendations were never implemented.

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Please note: The RCI Action Committee does not necessarily agree with all of the recommendations of this Senate report, but it is an important report to be considered in any assessment of the future role and organization of Radio Canada International.

For the record: Committee request for explanations from CRTC

On January 25, 2021, the Committee sent a request for explanations from Canada’s broadcasting regulatory body the CRTC concerning the lack of questions by CRTC commissioners when two separate witnesses testified that RCI’s administrator, CBC/Radio-Canada, had violated Article 46 (2) of the Broadcasting Act.

The Committee request for answers also highlighted the CRTC’s decision not to allow the Committee to address the same violation.

Here is the text our request for explanations:

Secretary General Doucet,

We would respectfully request that you explain the following puzzling situation:

Last week, two different interveners, former Radio Canada International (RCI) Executive Director, Andrew Simon, and union president Pierre Tousignant told commissioners that the CBC was violating the Broadcasting Act.

After both presentations none of the commissioners asked about the violations, even though these directly address the issue of the licence obligations of the CBC/Radio-Canada during these licence renewal hearings.

In the second presentation on Friday by the union president Pierre Tousignant, there were a number of topics to be dealt with, so on one level one could perhaps understand there was not enough time to deal with the issue.

However, the presentation of Andrew Simon on Wednesday, almost entirely dealt with the issue of the CBC’s violation of the Broadcasting Act. Yet there was not one question raised by the commissioners. Not even a question about which part of the Broadcasting Act was violated.

More puzzling, and almost disturbing, is the fact that the Chairperson basically shut down the possibility of discussion by saying (paragraphs 8578):

THE CHAIRPERSON: Thank you very much for your intervention. And you may know that we did have a discussion and some discussion last week about the current status of the service with executives from CBC Radio-Canada.

https://crtc.gc.ca/eng/transcripts/2021/tb01_20.htm

First of all, why would the Chairperson or the other commissioners not ask any questions, even if there were discussions, since the violation of the Broadcasting Act was at the centre of Andrew Simon’s presentation?

Second, the only mentions of RCI we could find during the previous week were two passing remarks by CBC President Catherine Tait:

Paragraph 528 on January 11, in the context of CBC’s presence internationally:

https://crtc.gc.ca/eng/transcripts/2021/tb01_11.htm

And of course we have RCI that has a very special role and we’re excited about some of the new things we’re doing with that particular service.

Paragrah 4062 on January 14 in response to a question on third-language programming

https://crtc.gc.ca/eng/transcripts/2021/tb01_14.htm

MS. TAIT: With respect to third-language programming, you know, CBC/Radio-Canada, it’s not determined in its mandate, with the exception of ICI, Radio-Canada International. And I think you heard from Luce earlier this week on what that service does, but really, most of that activity of third-language programming is left to the multicultural, multiethnic broadcasters.

Is this what Chairperson Ian Scott meant by discussion?

If these discussions “about the current status of the service with executives from CBC Radio-Canada” are not part of the public record of the hearings, what kind of discussions were they?

As you can imagine this issue is especially important to us, as we outlined in the urgent request to testify which we sent to you in an email on December 29, 2020, which we’ve been informed, will be “added to the public record of the proceeding.”

Despite the urgency of this issue, and the fact we only learned of this violation on December 3, we were refused an appearance by the CRTC’s Executive Director, Scott Shortliffe because our “request was sent very late in the process.” And yet, when others raised this issue at the hearings, the commissioners did not address it.

We count on the CRTC to act on this matter before the end of the CBC hearings this week.

Yours truly,

Wojtek Gwiazda

Spokesperson, RCI Action Committee


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If you would like to help us please consult this page:

What you can do – Comment vous pouvez nous aider

http://rciaction.org/blog/what-you-can-do/

For the record: Committee request to testify at CRTC hearings

On December 29, 2020, the RCI Action Committee sent a request to Canada’s broadcasting regulatory body the CRTC. It requested that we be able to testify at the licence hearings of CBC/Radio-Canada (which administers RCI) about the public broadcaster’s violation of Article 46 (2) of the Broadcasting Act. The request was refused for deadline reasons. “Unfortunately, your request was sent very late in the process.

In our request we had pointed out “We know this is extremely, almost impossibly, short notice. But we could not have predicted the December 3rd announcement, which will be implemented April 1, 2021″

On February 4, 2021, the CRTC confirmed that our request would not be put on the record by the CRTC.

Here is the text of our request to the CRTC Secretary General:


Secretary General Doucet,

On December 3, 2020, CBC/Radio-Canada announced a new policy that ignores its licence requirements. It violates article 46(2) of the Broadcasting Act and the Order in Council 2012-0775. And in so doing, it puts into question the survival of the Voice of Canada, Radio Canada International (RCI), after 75 years of existence.

I write to you as the spokesperson of the RCI Action Committee, a union supported committee that represents employees at RCI, and as someone who has testified, as the Committee’s spokesperson, before House of Commons and Senate committees since 1991. I was an announcer-producer with the service for 35 years, and retired five years ago.

We are appealing to CRTC commissioners to oblige the CBC to obey the conditions of its licence to have an international service with programming for an external audience, Article 46(2) of the Broadcasting Act.

In 1945, Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King inaugurated the international service saying the international service was to extend Canadian ideals of equality and freedom to the world. Since then the policy has never been so overtly challenged.

The decision of whether the Voice of Canada should serve an external audience belongs only to Parliament, and not the domestic public broadcaster, which has been entrusted with facilitating the work of the international service., not destroying it.

We at the committee ask you to let us present more fully the facts and our concerns to the panel of commissioners holding hearings into the CBC/Radio-Canada licence.

We know this is extremely, almost impossibly, short notice. But we could not have predicted the December 3rd announcement, which will be implemented April 1, 2021.

We can provide documentation of CBC/Radio-Canada’s failure to respect its obligations in this case and others.

For instance in 2012, CBC/Radio-Canada banned RCI from broadcasting on shortwave (its key way of communicating to the world since 1945) and it stopped consultations with the Department of Foreign Affairs, both in contravention of Order in Council 2003-0358. It destroyed our shortwave transmitters in Sackville, New Brunswick, the only transmitter site in Canada that allowed us to broadcast to the world.

We cannot overemphasize the disastrous impact of the CRTC not reacting to the CBC/Radio-Canada’s disregard of its obligations.

We leave you with this one thought:

Imagine the BBC World Service being told it should stop being a “world service.”

That is what CBC is doing to Radio Canada International (RCI).

Yours truly,

Wojtek Gwiazda

Spokesperson, RCI Action Committee

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If you would like to help us please consult this page:

What you can do – Comment vous pouvez nous aider

http://rciaction.org/blog/what-you-can-do/

Carta abierta en defensa de Radio Canada International al primer ministro canadiense y otros ministros

La siguiente carta abierta fue enviada, el 15 de febrero de 2021, al Primer Ministro Justin Trudeau, a la Viceprimera Ministra Chrystia Freeland, al Ministro de Asuntos Exteriores Marc Garneau y al Ministro del Patrimonio Canadiense Steven Guilbeault, pidiéndoles que mantengan la integridad de la Voz de Canadá para el Mundo, Radio Canadá Internacional (RCI).

Treinta y dos firmantes, entre los que se encuentran el ex primer ministro Joe Clark, el ex embajador de Canadá ante Naciones Unidas Stephen Lewis, la escritora Naomi Klein, el autor, compositor y director de cine Richard Desjardins y el actor Donald Sutherland, piden que se bloquee el anuncio de la política de CBC/Radio-Canada del 3 de diciembre de 2020, así como cualquier cambio en RCI, hasta que el personal del medio, junto con un grupo de personas calificadas ajenas a CBC/Radio-Canada, puedan proponer un plan para reconstruir el servicio internacional.

Los firmantes sostienen que el plan debe concebir una forma de autonomía financiera y editorial para RCI. También debe trazar un camino a seguir para restaurar el mandato internacional y la eficacia de Radio Canadá Internacional en el contexto actual y futuro.

Por favor, vea también “Maneras en las que usted puede ayudar”.

Carta abierta

Hacemos un llamamiento al Primer Ministro Justin Trudeau, a la Viceprimera Ministra Chrystia Freeland, al Ministro de Asuntos Exteriores Marc Garneau, al Ministro del Patrimonio Canadiense Steven Guilbeault y al Parlamento para que preserven la integridad de la Voz de Canadá para el Mundo, Radio Canadá Internacional (RCI).

Desde hace más de 30 años, la CBC/Radio-Canadá intenta renunciar a su obligación de permitir que el servicio internacional desempeñe su función de transmitir la realidad canadiense a un público externo.

En primer lugar, en 1990, la CBC/Radio-Canadá intentó poner fin al servicio, después de haber utilizado los fondos destinados a RCI, para minimizar los recortes presupuestarios del servicio nacional.

En segundo lugar, en 2012, en contra de sus requisitos de licencia, CBC/Radio-Canada obligó a que RCI cese sus operaciones de radio de onda corta.

Más recientemente, en diciembre de 2020, de nuevo violando la Ley de Radiodifusión, CBC/Radio-Canada decidió que RCI dejaría de centrarse en la producción de programas para el público en el extranjero, su razón de ser desde 1945.

En un mundo interconectado que busca la verdad, los hechos y el periodismo honesto, países como Canadá no pueden renunciar a su papel en la escena mundial. No se trata de si podemos permitirnos una Radio Canadá Internacional fuerte. Se trata de si podemos permitirnos no tenerla.

No debemos subestimar el deseo de la gente de todo el mundo de saber más sobre Canadá, ya sea cómo funciona nuestra democracia, qué significa ser canadiense, nuestras relaciones multilaterales con otros países y todas las demás realidades que conforman nuestra nación.

La radiodifusión pública es una misión sagrada. Es la creencia en un ideal. Ese ideal se encarna en la determinación y la dedicación de los empleados de RCI para reconstruir una institución que está en ruinas. Hará falta imaginación, un acto de fe y la convicción de que nuestro país no sólo merece, sino que debe tener una voz independiente y creíble en la escena mundial.

Para avanzar, pedimos que se bloquee el anuncio de la política de CBC/Radio-Canadá del 3 de diciembre de 2020. Que se suspenda cualquier cambio en RCI hasta que el personal de la misma, acompañado por un grupo de personas calificadas, ajenas a CBC/Radio-Canadá, pueda proponer un plan para reconstruir el servicio internacional. El plan debe concebir una forma de autonomía financiera y editorial para RCI y esbozar un camino para restaurar el mandato internacional y la eficacia de Radio Canadá Internacional en el contexto de hoy y de mañana.

Firmada por:

Sami Aoun, profesor e investigador.

Michel Arpin, Vicepresidente de radiodifusión de la CRTC (2005-2010), Presidente del Consejo de Administración de la Asociación Canadiense de Radiodifusión (1984-1986).

Lloyd Axworthy, ex ministro de Asuntos Exteriores, presidente del Consejo Mundial para los Refugiados y la Migración.

Daniel Bernhard, Director Ejecutivo de Amigos de la Radiodifusión Canadiense.

Mark Bulgutch, ex productor ejecutivo de CBC News

David Carment, editor de Palgrave’s Canada and International Affairs, editor de Periódico de Política Exterior Canadiense y miembro del Instituto Canadiense de Relaciones Internacionales.

Margaret Catley-Carlson, ex presidenta de la Agencia Canadiense de Desarrollo Internacional (ACDI), ex viceministra del Ministerio de Salud y Bienestar, ex presidenta de la Asociación Mundial del Agua.

Honorable Joe Clark, ex Primer Ministro de Canadá.

Louise Desjardins, autora.

Richard Desjardins, cantautor y cineasta.

Jeffrey Dvorkin, ex editor y reportero jefe de CBC Radio.

Allan Familiant, ex director interino y ex director de programas de Radio Canadá Internacional.

Sheila Fischman, traductora literaria, Premio Literario del Gobernador General, Premio Molson de las Artes.

Nigel Fisher, ex Subsecretario General de las Naciones Unidas.

Wojtek Gwiazda, portavoz del Comité de Acción de RCI, ex presentador y realizador de Radio Canadá Internacional (1980-2015).

Sheldon Harvey, Presidente del Canadian International DX Club.

Naomi Klein, autora.

Avi Lewis, cineasta.

Stephen Lewis, ex embajador de Canadá ante la ONU.

Rowland Lorimer, director del Periódico Canadiense sobre Comunicación.

Robin MacNab, funcionario del servicio diplomático exterior canadiense (1971 – 2015).

Kyle Matthews, Director Ejecutivo del Instituto de Estudios sobre el Genocidio y los Derechos Humanos de Montreal.

Abhishek Mathur y Jyoti Rana, cofundadores del Festival Toronto Masala. ¡Mehndi! ¡Masti!

Errol Mendes, Profesor de Derecho y Presidente de la Comisión Internacional de Juristas – Canadá.

Peter Menzies, ex vicepresidente de la CRTC y miembro principal del Instituto Macdonald-Laurier.

Alex Neve, ex secretario general de Amnistía Internacional Canadá (2000-2020)

Samantha Nutt, fundadora de War Child Canada y autora de best-sellers.

Elzbieta Olechowska, ex editora de programación en inglés y francés, RCI/CBC/Radio-Canada, empleada de 1981 hasta 2008.

Robert O’Reilly, ex director general de Radio Canadá Internacional.

Andrew Simon, ex director general de Radio Canadá Internacional.

Donald McNichol Sutherland, actor.

Donald Winkler, documentalista y traductor literario.

Por favor, vea también “Maneras en las que usted puede ayudar”.

Breve historia de Radio Canadá Internacional

Setenta y cinco años es mucho tiempo, así que no es extraño que la mayoría de la gente no sepa lo que ha hecho Radio Canadá Internacional (RCI) desde su inauguración en 1945. Evidentemente, es imposible enumerar todos sus logros y premios, pero vamos a tratar de ver algunos de ellos.

Radio Canadá Internacional (RCI) era una emisora internacional de tamaño medio muy respetada, que produjo programas en unos 20 idiomas diferentes. Como voz de Canadá para el mundo, innovó con la radiodifusión de onda corta, los acuerdos de intercambio de tiempo de transmisión, las emisiones por satélite, la implantación de programas e Internet. Se ganó aprecio y premios en todo el mundo no sólo por su programación de noticias y asuntos de actualidad, sino también por otros numerosos servicios, como las clases de francés e inglés para emisoras locales de todo el mundo, y la grabación y distribución de discos de artistas canadienses populares y clásicos.

He aquí un rápido repaso de RCI desde 1945:

En 1990, Radio Canadá Internacional tenía una audiencia de entre 9 y 16 millones de personas.  Emitía programas especialmente dirigidos en inglés y en francés a Europa, África, Asia y América. También tenía programas específicos en ruso, ucraniano, polaco, checo, eslovaco, húngaro, alemán, portugués, español, árabe, mandarín, cantonés y japonés. Tras los recortes de 1991, sólo quedaban siete idiomas, pero RCI seguía ofreciendo 232 horas de programación original que se escuchaban en todo el mundo.

En 1982, para asegurarse de que RCI ofreciera noticias rápidas y detalladas, adaptadas a una audiencia internacional, desde la capital de Canadá, se creó una oficina en Ottawa con tres periodistas en inglés y tres en francés que informaban diariamente a todas las zonas destinatarias de los programas de RCI.

El Servicio de Transcripción Musical de RCI, que comenzó oficialmente en 1947 y terminó con los recortes en 1991, grababa a artistas populares, de jazz y clásicos, y difundía estas grabaciones en todo el mundo. Entre otros, Glenn Gould, Oscar Peterson, Louis Lortie, Pierrette Alarie, Jean Carignan, Moe Koffman, Tommy Banks, Karen Young, Andre Gagnon, UZEB, Pauline Julien, Gilles Vigneault fueron parte de estas grabaciones. Consulte este artículo de la Enciclopedia Canadiense (en inglés o francés).

Radio Canadá Internacional fue también una de las primeras en innovar y adoptar el Internet como medio de transmisión de información. Su sitio web se inició en 1996, y al año siguiente presentó un sitio web interactivo en siete idiomas que ofrecía información política y actualizaciones en directo de los resultados de las elecciones, además de reportajes grabados. Todo ello además de su programación habitual en directo con análisis y los resultados de las elecciones en todos los idiomas del mundo, por ejemplo.

RCI produjo programas musicales y de diálogo para emisoras de radio extranjeras.

RCI produjo una colección mensual “Pick of the Pops” de éxitos musicales canadienses en inglés y francés que se distribuía a 250 emisoras de todo el mundo.

RCI produjo cursos de radio en inglés y francés sobre la realidad canadiense y los distribuyó a emisoras de radio de todo el mundo en Europa, África, Asia y América Latina.

RCI gestionó y supervisó la programación de la Red de las Fuerzas Canadienses para las fuerzas de paz canadienses en todo el mundo.

RCI produjo un programa semanal de negocios de media hora que se emitió localmente en Hong Kong.

En su sitio de transmisión de onda corta en Sackville, Nuevo Brunswick, los ingenieros de RCI introdujeron técnicas innovadoras para ampliar el alcance de RCI en todo el mundo, además de innovar en los acuerdos de intercambio de tiempo de transmisión con emisoras internacionales de todo el mundo.

En la década de 1990, RCI organizó una serie de conferencias bienales denominadas Desafíos para la Radiodifusión Internacional que reunían a radiodifusores internacionales, académicos y otros.

Desde 2012, RCI produce programas y artículos de noticias y de fondo en inglés, francés, español, árabe y chino.

En 2020, la emisora nacional CBC/Radio-Canada anunció que el personal de RCI traduciría los textos de su servicio nacional, y que tendría una plantilla total de nueve personas.

En 2020, la emisora nacional CBC/Radio-Canada anunció que el personal de RCI traduciría los textos de su servicio nacional, y que tendría una plantilla total de nueve personas.

Colaboraciones del Servicio latinoamericano

- Coberture journalistique du la participation de Premier minstre du Canada au Sommet de la APEC à Los Cabos, Mexique, en 2002

- Coproduction avec Radio Fe y Alegría à Caracas, Venezuela.

- Coproduction avec le Institut Mexicain de la Radio, IMER, à Guadalajara lors de la Foire International du Livre. Québec était l`invité d`honneur.

- Coproduction avec Radio Education du Mexique

Por favor, vea también “Maneras en las que usted puede ayudar”.

Open letter to PM, Ministers calls for international service to be strengthened, not cut

The following open letter was sent February 15, 2021 to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau, and Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault asking them to maintain the integrity of Canada’s Voice to the World, Radio Canada International (RCI).

Thirty-two signatories, including former Prime Minister Joe Clark, former Canadian ambassador to the United Nations Stephen Lewis, author-composer-songwriter-film director Richard Desjardins, author Naomi Klein, and actor Donald Sutherland, ask that the CBC/Radio-Canada policy announcement of December 3, 2020 be blocked, as well as any changes to RCI, until RCI staff, along with an assembled group of qualified people outside CBC/Radio-Canada, can propose a plan to rebuild the international service.

The signatories say the plan should devise a form of financial and editorial autonomy for RCI. And outline a path to follow to restore the international mandate and effectiveness of Radio Canada International in the context of today and the future.

For more information, please contact Wojtek Gwiazda, Spokesperson, RCI Action Committee, wojtekrciaction@gmail.com

If you would like to help us please consult this page:

What you can do – Comment vous pouvez nous aider

http://rciaction.org/blog/what-you-can-do/

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Open letter

We call on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau, Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault, and Parliament to maintain the integrity of Canada’s Voice to the World, Radio Canada International (RCI).

For more than 30 years, CBC/Radio-Canada has tried to abandon its obligation to allow the international service to do its job of transmitting the Canadian reality to an external audience.

In 1990, CBC/Radio-Canada tried to shut down the service, after using money earmarked for RCI, to minimize budget cuts to the domestic service.

In 2012, contrary to its licence requirements, CBC/Radio-Canada forced RCI to stop being a radio station broadcasting on shortwave.

Now in December of 2020, again in violation of the Broadcasting Act, CBC/Radio-Canada has decided to take away RCI’s focus on producing programming for an external audience, its raison d’être since 1945.

In an interconnected world in search of truth, facts and honest journalism, countries like Canada cannot abdicate their role on the world stage. It’s not a question of whether we can afford to have a strong Radio Canada International. It’s whether we can afford not to have it.

We must not underestimate the desire of people around the world to know more about Canada, about how our democracy works, about what it means to be Canadian, about our multilateral relations with other countries, and all the other realities that make up our nation.

Public broadcasting is a sacred trust. It is a belief in an ideal. That ideal is embodied in the determination and dedication of RCI employees to rebuild a tattered institution. It will take imagination, a leap of faith, and a belief that our country not only deserves, but also must have an independent, believable voice on the world stage.

To proceed forward, we ask that the CBC/Radio-Canada policy announcement of December 3, 2020 be blocked. That any changes to RCI be put on hold until RCI staff, along with an assembled group of qualified people outside CBC/Radio-Canada, can propose a plan to rebuild the international service. The plan should devise a form of financial and editorial autonomy for RCI. And outline a path to follow to restore the international mandate and effectiveness of Radio Canada International in the context of today and the future.

Signed by:

Sami Aoun, Professor and researcher

Michel Arpin, CRTC Vice Chairman Broadcasting (2005-2010), Canadian Association of Broadcasters Chairman of the Board of Directors (1984-1986)

Lloyd Axworthy, former Foreign Affairs Minister, Chair of the World Refugee and Migration Council

Daniel Bernhard, Executive Director, Friends of Canadian Broadcasting

Mark Bulgutch, former Senior Executive Producer, CBC News

David Carment, Editor, Palgrave’s Canada and International Affairs, Editor, Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, and Fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute

Margaret Catley-Carlson, former President, Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), former Deputy Minister Department of Health and Welfare, former Chair, Global Water Partnership

Rt. Hon. Joe Clark, former Prime Minister of Canada

Louise Desjardins, author

Richard Desjardins, author, composer, singer, filmmaker

Jeffrey Dvorkin, former Managing Editor and Chief Journalist, CBC Radio

Allan Familiant, former Acting Director and former Program Director, Radio Canada International

Sheila Fischman CM CQ, literary translator, Governor General’s Literary Award, Molson Prize in the Arts

Nigel Fisher OC, former Assistant Secretary-General of the United Nations

Wojtek Gwiazda, spokesperson RCI Action Committee, former host-producer Radio Canada International (1980-2015)

Sheldon Harvey, President Canadian International DX Club

Naomi Klein, author

Avi Lewis, filmmaker

Stephen Lewis, former Canadian Ambassador to the UN

Rowland Lorimer, publisher Canadian Journal of Communication

Robin MacNab, Canadian Foreign Service Officer 1971 – 2015

Kyle Matthews, Executive Director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies

Abhishek Mathur and Jyoti Rana, co-founders of Toronto’s Masala! Mehndi! Masti! Festival

Errol Mendes, Professor of Law and President, International Commission of Jurists, Canada

Peter Menzies, former CRTC vice chair and Macdonald Laurier Institute Senior Fellow

Alex Neve, former Secretary General of Amnesty International Canada (2000-2020)

Samantha Nutt, MD, MSc, FRCPC, CM, OOnt, Founder, War Child Canada and bestselling author

Elzbieta Olechowska, former Editor-in-Chief of English & French Programming, RCI/CBC/Radio-Canada employee from 1981-2008

Robert O’Reilly, former Executive Director, Radio Canada International

Andrew Simon, former Executive Director, Radio Canada International

Donald McNichol Sutherland CC

Donald Winkler, documentary filmmaker and literary translator

Lettre ouverte au premier ministre, ministres, exige que le service international soit renforcé, pas coupé

La lettre ouverte suivante a été envoyée le 15 février 2021 au premier ministre Justin Trudeau, à la vice-première ministre Chrystia Freeland, au ministre des Affaires étrangères Marc Garneau, au ministre du Patrimoine canadien Steven Guilbeault leur demandant de maintenir l’intégrité de la Voix du Canada sur le monde, Radio Canada International (RCI).

Trente-deux signataires, dont l’ancien premier ministre Joe Clark, l’ancien ambassadeur du Canada auprès des Nations Unies Stephen Lewis, l’acteur Donald Sutherland, l’auteure Naomi Klein et l’auteur-compositeur-interprète-cinéaste Richard Desjardins demandent que l’annonce de la politique de Radio-Canada/CBC du 3 décembre 2020 soit bloquée, ainsi que tout changement à RCI, jusqu’à ce que le personnel de RCI, accompagné d’un groupe de personnes qualifiées à l’extérieur de Radio-Canada/ CBC, puisse proposer un plan pour reconstruire le service international.

Les signataires stipulent que le plan devrait concevoir une forme d’autonomie financière et éditoriale pour RCI. Et esquisser une voie à suivre pour restaurer le mandat international et l’efficacité de Radio Canada International dans le contexte d’aujourd’hui et de demain.

Pour plus d’information veuillez contacter Wojtek Gwiazda, porte-parole, Comité d’action de RCI, wojtekrciaction@gmail.com

Si vous souhaitez nous aider, veuillez consulter cette page:

Comment vous pouvez nous aider – What you can do

http://rciaction.org/blog/what-you-can-do/

**********************************************************

Lettre ouverte

Nous demandons au premier ministre Justin Trudeau, la vice-première ministre Chrystia Freeland, au ministre des Affaires étrangères Marc Garneau, au ministre du Patrimoine canadien Steven Guilbeault et au Parlement à préserver l’intégrité de la Voix du Canada sur le monde, Radio Canada International (RCI).

Depuis plus de 30 ans, Radio-Canada/ CBC tente de renoncer à son obligation de permettre au service international de jouer son rôle qui consiste à transmettre la réalité canadienne à un auditoire externe.

Tout d’abord, c’est en 1990 que Radio-Canada/ CBC essaie de mettre fin au service, après avoir utilisé les fonds destinés à RCI, afin de minimiser les coupures budgétaires au service national.

C’est ensuite en 2012, contrairement à ses exigences de licence, que Radio-Canada/ CBC force

RCI à cesser ses activités de radio diffusant sur ondes courtes.

Tout dernièrement, en décembre 2020, encore une fois en violation de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion, Radio-Canada/ CBC décide que RCI ne mettrait plus l’accent sur la production d’émissions destinées à un auditoire externe, sa raison d’être depuis 1945.

Dans un monde interconnecté en quête de vérité, de faits et de journalisme honnête, des pays comme le Canada ne peuvent pas renoncer à leur rôle sur la scène mondiale. Il ne s’agit pas de savoir si nous pouvons nous permettre d’avoir une Radio Canada International forte. Il s’agit plutôt de savoir si nous pouvons nous permettre de ne pas l’avoir.

Nous ne devons pas sous-estimer le désir des gens du monde entier d’en savoir plus sur le Canada, que ce soit le fonctionnement de notre démocratie, ce que signifie être canadien, nos relations multilatérales avec d’autres pays et toutes les autres réalités qui constituent notre nation.

La radiodiffusion publique est une mission sacrée. C’est une croyance en un idéal. Cet idéal est incarné dans la détermination et le dévouement des employés de RCI à reconstruire une institution qui se trouve en lambeaux. Il faudra de l’imagination, un acte de foi et la conviction que notre pays non seulement mérite, mais doit aussi avoir une voix indépendante et crédible sur la scène mondiale.

Pour aller de l’avant, nous demandons que l’annonce de la politique de Radio-Canada/ CBC du 3 décembre 2020 soit bloquée. Que tout changement à RCI soit mis en attente jusqu’à ce que le personnel de RCI, accompagné d’un groupe de personnes qualifiées à l’extérieur de Radio-Canada/ CBC, puisse proposer un plan pour reconstruire le service international. Le plan devrait concevoir une forme d’autonomie financière et éditoriale pour RCI et esquisser une voie à suivre pour restaurer le mandat international et l’efficacité de Radio Canada International dans le contexte d’aujourd’hui et de demain.

Signé par :

Sami Aoun, Professeur et chercheur

Michel Arpin, Vice-président à la radiodiffusion du CRTC (2005-2010), L’association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs Président du Conseil d’administration (1984-1986)

Lloyd Axworthy, ancien ministre des Affaires étrangères, président World Refugee and Migration Council

Daniel Bernhard, directeur général, les AMIS de la radiodiffusion canadienne.

Mark Bulgutch, ancien réalisateur exécutif senior, CBC News

David Carment, rédacteur Palgrave’s Canada and International Affairs, rédacteur, Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, et « Fellow  » de l’Institut canadien des affaires mondiales

Margaret Catley-Carlson, ancien président, Agence canadienne de développement international (ACDI), ancienne sous-ministre du ministère de la Santé et du Bien-être social, ancienne présidente, Global Water Partnership

Très honorable Joe Clark, ancien premier ministre du Canada

Louise Desjardins, autrice

Richard Desjardins, auteur-compositeur-interprète-cinéaste

Jeffrey Dvorkin, ancien rédacteur en chef et journaliste en chef, CBC Radio

Allan Familiant, ancien directeur par intérim et ancien directeur de programme, Radio Canada International

Sheila Fischman CM CQ, traductrice littéraire, Prix littéraire du Gouverneur général, Prix Molson des arts

Nigel Fisher OC, ancien Sous-Secrétaire général des Nations Unies

Wojtek Gwiazda, porte-parole, Comité d’action de RCI, ancien animateur-réalisateur Radio Canada International (1980-2015)

Sheldon Harvey, Président Canadian International DX Club

Naomi Klein, auteure

Avi Lewis, cinéaste

Stephen Lewis, ancien ambassadeur du Canada à l’ONU

Rowland Lorimer, éditeur Canadian Journal of Communication

Robin MacNab, Agent du service extérieur diplomatique canadien 1971 – 2015

Kyle Matthews, directeur général de l’Institut d’études sur le génocide et les droits de l’homme de Montréal

Abhishek Mathur and Jyoti Rana, co-fondateurs du festival torontois Masala! Mehndi! Masti!

Errol Mendes, Professeur de droit et président de la Commission international de juristes – Canada

Peter Menzies, ancien vice-président du CRTC et « Fellow Senior » l’Institut Macdonald-Laurier

Alex Neve, ancien secrétaire générale d’Amnistie internationale Canada (2000-2020)

Samantha Nutt, MD, MSc, FRCPC, CM, OOnt, fondatrice, War Child Canada et auteure à succès

Elzbieta Olechowska, l’ancienne rédactrice en chef de la programmation anglaise et française, RCI/CBC/Radio-Canada employée de 1981-2008

Robert O’Reilly, ancien directeur général, Radio Canada International

Andrew Simon, ancien directeur général, Radio Canada International

Donald McNichol Sutherland CC

Donald Winkler, réalisateur de documentaires et traducteur littéraire

Broadcast regulator ignores crucial RCI questions

Canada’s broadcast regulator is ignoring charges that the CBC/Radio-Canada’s latest policy decision on Radio Canada International (RCI) is in violation of the Broadcasting Act. In a letter to the CRTC, the RCI Action Committee is asking for answers.

Twice last week at the public hearings of Canada’s broadcasting and telecommunications agency the CRTC, investigating commissioners were told our national public broadcaster was violating the Broadcasting Act of Canada. Yet both times no questions were asked about the violations, despite the fact the hearings are being held to decide on the renewal of the national public broadcaster’s licence. The CBC/Radio-Canada is responsible for administering RCI under the Broadcasting Act.

On January 20, 2021, former RCI Executive Director Andrew Simon described the CBC/Radio-Canada’s “…incredible 30 year campaign to abandon its obligation to run Canada’s Voice to the World.”

… when I was Executive Director of Radio Canada International, and when we broadcast in 14 languages, 7 days a week, CBC tried to shut us down. Then it got a $12‑milion — $12 million from the then External Affairs to operate a much-reduced service. In 2012, it stopped broadcasting on shortwave and later demolished its Sackville transmitters. RCI continued on the Internet in only five languages.

Later in his presentation he said the new policy announced by CBC/Radio-Canada to transform RCI turned its focus away from RCI’s international mandate, which contravenes the Broadcasting Act.

The Broadcasting Act requires CBC, and I’m quoting, “to operate an international service which produces and distributes programming targeted at international audiences to increase awareness of Canada, its values, its social, economic and cultural activities”…

This needs further examination by the Commission and we certainly require an immediate ruling on CBC’s latest policy announcement that I just mentioned.

I think Parliament, and not the corporation, should decide if Canada has the Voice to the World, and how well such a service should be funded. As everyone tells us, the world needs more Canada.

Immediately, the CRTC chairperson Ian Scott, who was moderating the hearings, replied: “Thank you very much for your intervention. And you may know that we did have a discussion and some discussion last week about the current status of the service with executives from CBC Radio-Canada.” And then, there were no questions for Simon.

Yet searching several times through the transcripts of the hearings, we have only found two very brief mentions referring to Radio Canada International, and that in contexts totally unrelated to the international service.

On January 22, 2021, two days after Andrew Simon spoke, Pierre Tousignant, the president of the Syndicat des travailleurs et travailleuses de Radio-Canada was part of a larger presentation at the CRTC hearings given by unions representing media employees.

During his presentation in French, Tousignant described the “modernizing” of Radio Canada International announced in December as “another step in the slow death” of RCI. He said CBC/Radio-Canada did not respect RCI’s international mandate “to increase awareness of Canada, its values and its social, cultural and economic vitality.”

Nous soumettons respectueusement au CRTC et lui demandons d’examiner ce que nous considérons comme une violation par la SRC de l’article 46(2) de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion et du décret 2012-075. [Translation: We respectfully submit to the CRTC and ask it to review what we consider to be a violation by the CBC of section 46 (2) of the Broadcasting Act and Order in Council 2012-075.]

There was only one question to Tousignant about his statement and it was about the podcasts that would be produced under the new RCI policy. Again, no questions were asked about the violation of Article 46 (2) of the Broadcasting Act and Order in Council 2012-0775 which clearly outline CBC/Radio-Canada’s obligations to RCI’s international mandate as a condition of its licence.

We are more than just puzzled that the regulatory body, which refused the RCI Action Committee’s request to testify at the hearings because our request did not fit their request deadlines, did not deal with the violations brought up by the former Executive Director of RCI and the union president who represents RCI employees.

We immediately (January 25) emailed the Secretary General and the Chairperson of the CRTC requesting an explanation for the lack of questions on the charges made by the two intervenors.

We referenced in particular the statement made by the Chairperson following Andrew Simon’s presentation that  they “did have a discussion and some discussion last week about the current status of the service with executives from CBC Radio-Canada.”

First we asked: “…why would the Chairperson or the other commissioners not ask any questions, even if there were discussions, since the violation of the Broadcasting Act was at the centre of Andrew Simon’s presentation?

Second, after quoting the two short mentions of RCI in the transcripts of the hearings we asked:

Is this what Chairperson Ian Scott meant by discussion?

If these discussions “about the current status of the service with executives from CBC Radio-Canada” are not part of the public record of the hearings, what kind of discussions were they?

We ended our email with this request:

We count on the CRTC to act on this matter before the end of the CBC hearings this week.

As of today we have had no answer or any acknowledgement of our email.

We’ll keep you updated on the status of our request, and on the CRTC hearings.

___

UPDATE – January 27, 2021: Today we received an email from the CRTC in reaction to our email on January 25 telling us “for reasons of procedural fairness, the Commission cannot comment on an ongoing proceeding.”

UPDATE – February 4, 2021: Today an email from the CRTC Senior Broadcasting Analyst confirmed our December 29. 2020 letter to the CRTC asking to testify at the CBC licence hearings about the public broadcaster’s violation of the Broadcasting Act Article 46 (2) will NOT be put into the public record by the CRTC.

___

Detailed explanation of how the December 3, 2020 policy announcement does not respect the international mandate of RCI here

‘Major transformation’ does not respect international mandate of RCI

En français ici

Does the new “major transformation” of Radio Canada International respect the international mandate of RCI? The short answer is no.

At the moment the obligations of CBC/Radio-Canada in the Broadcasting Act and the Order in Council of 2012 are as follows:

Broadcasting Act of 1991

International service

46 (2) The Corporation shall, within the conditions of any licence or licences issued to it by the Commission and subject to any applicable regulations of the Commission, provide an international service in accordance with such directions as the Governor in Council may issue.

https://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/B-9.01/FullText.html

Order in Council 2012-0775

(iii) to produce and distribute programming targeted at international audiences to increase awareness of Canada, its values and its social, economic and cultural activities

https://orders-in-council.canada.ca/attachment.php?attach=26200&lang=en

According to a number of RCI colleagues, when asked, CBC/Radio-Canada administrators said this new policy respects RCI’s mandate to serve an external audience.

It is true that in the press release of December 3, CBC/Radio-Canada states:

“In its strategic plan ‘Your Stories, Taken to Heart’ CBC/Radio-Canada committed to ‘taking Canada to the world’ and ‘reflecting contemporary Canada.’ Transforming RCI is a necessary step to allow the service to effectively fulfill the important role it must play in delivering on those commitments. To that end, RCI will soon be offering more content in more languages, drawing on the work of CBC/Radio-Canada’s respected news teams to reach new audiences at home and abroad.”

https://cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/media-centre/radio-canada-international-transformation

If we examine “Your Stories, Taken to Heart,” and its goal of “Taking Canada to the World” we find no mention of RCI. Even in the article of CBC president Catherine Tait “Yes, the world needs more Canada” there is no mention of RCI, even though she mentions the importance of the BBC World Service for cultural diplomacy and to enhancing the U.K.’s influence abroad, as well as the growth of the BBC World Service’s audience this year.

When we examine the CBC/Radio-Canada press release of December 3, this is what we find describing RCI’s role (see in particular underlined phrases):

“Since its founding, RCI has played a key role in providing a Canadian perspective on world affairs and, since 2012, in connecting with newcomers to our country.”

And the press release presents the key areas of this RCI transformation:

“the editorial offering from five languages to seven, with the addition of complete sections in Punjabi (the third-most-spoken language among immigrants to Canada after the main Chinese languages, Mandarin and Cantonese) and Tagalog (the language of the Philippines and increasingly spoken in Canada).”

“These changes will not only boost RCI’s audience and relevance, but also help the service engage more deeply with its target audience, particularly newcomers to Canada.”

By becoming more relevant, more visible or more widely available in the languages spoken by the largest number of new Canadians, the new offering will allow Radio Canada International to better connect and engage with its target audience. RCI will also make all this content freely available to interested ethnic community media.”

What is clear in these statements is that the main priority of this transformation is to target an audience in Canada. But this goal is nowhere to be found in the Broadcasting Act or the Order in Council that affects Radio Canada International.

___

For more information on the “major transformation” of RCI, read details here

_____

RCI Action Committee

Website: http://rciaction.org/blog/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/rci_action

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rci_action_committee/

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/61392551483

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Radio-Canada-International-Action-Committee-RCI-Action-Committee-111166015613472/

Email: rciaction@yahoo.ca

Spokesperson: wojtekrciaction@gmail.com

La nouvelle «transformation majeure» ne respecte pas le mandat international de RCI

In English here

La nouvelle «transformation majeure» de Radio Canada International respecte-t-elle le mandat international de RCI? La réponse courte est non.

Pour le moment les obligations de Radio-Canada / CBC dans le Loi sur la radiodiffusion et le décret de 2012 :

Loi sur la radiodiffusion 1991
Service international
46 (2) La Société fournit, dans le cadre des licences qui lui sont attribuées par le Conseil et sous réserve des règlements de celui-ci, un service international, et ce conformément aux instructions que le gouverneur en conseil peut donner.
https://laws.justice.gc.ca/fra/lois/B-9.01/TexteComplet.html

Décret C.P.  2012-0775
https://orders-in-council.canada.ca/attachment.php?attach=26200&lang=en
(iii) produire et distribuer une programmation conçue pour des auditoires étrangers en vue de mieux connaître le Canada, ses valeurs et sa vie sociale, économique et culturelle,

Selon plusieurs des collègues de RCI, les administrateurs de Radio-Canada / CBC qui les ont rencontrés ont répondu à des questions sur le mandat en disant que cette nouvelle politique respecte le mandat.

Il est vrai que dans son communiqué de presse Radio-Canada / CBC stipule :

“Dans son plan stratégique ‘Entre nous, c’est pour la vie’, CBC/Radio-Canada s’est engagée à faire rayonner le Canada dans le monde et à mieux incarner le Canada d’aujourd’hui. La transformation de RCI s’impose pour lui permettre de s’acquitter concrètement du rôle de premier plan que le service doit jouer à cet égard. Ainsi, RCI offrira bientôt plus de contenus dans un plus grand nombre de langues, en s’appuyant sur le travail des équipes journalistiques réputées de CBC/Radio-Canada afin de rejoindre de nouveaux publics au pays comme à l’étranger.”

https://cbc.radio-canada.ca/fr/salle-de-presse/transformation-majeure-de-radio-canada-international

Si dans ‘Entre nous, c’est pour la vie’, nous examinons ce que pourrait impliquer ce mandat international, sous «Faire rayonner le Canada dans le monde» on ne trouve aucune mention de RCI. Même dans l’article du président de la Radio-Canada/CBC Catherine Tait « Le monde a besoin de plus de Canada » il n’y a aucune mention de RCI, même si elle mentionne l’importance du service mondial de la BBC pour la diplomatie culturelle et l’influence du Royaume-Uni à l’étranger, et la croissance cette année de l’audience du service mondial de la BBC.

https://cbc.radio-canada.ca/fr/vision/strategie/entre-nous-cest-pour-la-vie

Quand on examine ce que dit le communiqué de presse de Radio-Canada / CBC, du 3 décembre, sur le rôle de RCI, nous trouvons des phrases comme celle-ci:

« Depuis sa création, RCI joue un rôle important pour offrir une perspective canadienne sur l’actualité à l’échelle internationale et, depuis 2012, pour créer des liens avec les nouveaux arrivants au pays.”

Et le communiqué de presse décrite clairement les contours de cette transformation:

“…offre éditoriale qui passe de 5 à 7 langues en ajoutant une section complète en pendjabi, 3e langue la plus parlée chez les immigrants canadiens, après les langues chinoises (mandarin et cantonais), et une section complète en tagalog (langue des Philippines en croissance au Canada).”

“Tous ces changements visent non seulement à accentuer la pertinence et la fréquentation de RCI, mais à favoriser une interaction accrue et stimulante avec son public cible et en particulier les nouveaux arrivants.”

Plus pertinente, plus visible et disponible dans les langues parlées par un grand nombre de nouveaux Canadiens, la nouvelle offre de Radio Canada International favorisera une meilleure interaction avec son public cible. RCI rendra également tous ses contenus disponibles gratuitement aux médias multilingues intéressés.”

Ce qui est clair dans ces déclarations, c’est que la haute priorité de cette transformation est de cibler les publics au Canada. Mais ces priorités ne se trouvent nulle part dans la loi sur la radiodiffusion ou dans le décret.

___

Plus d’information sur la nouvelle «transformation majeure» : http://rciaction.org/blog/2020/12/13/%c2%abmodernisation%c2%bb-de-rci-a-mort/

____

Comité d’action de RCI

Site Web: http://rciaction.org/blog/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/rci_action

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rci_action_committee/

Groupe Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/61392551483

Page Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Radio-Canada-International-Action-Committee-RCI-Action-Committee-111166015613472/

Courriel: rciaction@yahoo.ca

Porte-parole: wojtekrciaction@gmail.com

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